MA request for lsem

Re: MA request for lsem

Postby h.harb » Sat Jan 25, 2020 5:06 pm

The whole idea of doing slow releases either in Garlands or the formal "Two Footed releases" is to learn and feel that a ski can release, the tips go downhill and the tails of the skis follow the tips. If the tails go uphill even an inch from their starting point, you twisted the skis. This means you are using your hip, butt, and legs to get the skis moving. The whole point is to learn to let go, let the lack of friction start the skis downhill as they get flat. First, you have to have a certain amount of CA and fore/aft balance. After that, it's a matter of finding the right balance change timing to the outside ski. There is no end to such practice and you can learn to become very precise with energy minimization, let gravity take over.
User avatar
h.harb
 
Posts: 6969
Joined: Sat Feb 03, 2007 2:08 pm
Location: Dumont, Colorado

Re: MA request for lsem

Postby marsound » Tue Jan 28, 2020 9:51 am

h.harb wrote:The whole idea of doing slow releases either in Garlands or the formal "Two Footed releases" is to learn and feel that a ski can release, the tips go downhill and the tails of the skis follow the tips. If the tails go uphill even an inch from their starting point, you twisted the skis. This means you are using your hip, butt, and legs to get the skis moving. The whole point is to learn to let go, let the lack of friction start the skis downhill as they get flat. First, you have to have a certain amount of CA and fore/aft balance. After that, it's a matter of finding the right balance change timing to the outside ski. There is no end to such practice and you can learn to become very precise with energy minimization, let gravity take over.


This post is a GEM!
User avatar
marsound
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 4:40 pm

Re: MA request for lsem

Postby lsem » Tue Jan 28, 2020 10:24 am

Thank you Max, thank you Harald!

I spent some time thinking about problems you have pointed out and seems like I found out where it comes from.
Even though I don't twist or pivot skis deliberately, when I tip my ankle moves not only in lateral plane, but after doing some amount of inversion, toes go outwards while heel goes inwards. With ski attached to the foot it must be what produces this pivoting. It might be reinforced by coiling coming from release from countered position, that is why this unintentional pivoting is so pronounced.

This tails displacing was immediately spotted at Hintertux camp by coaches and it was my focus during some days, now, apparently, it has returned back.

Will be working on it.
lsem
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri May 11, 2018 8:07 am

Re: MA request for lsem

Postby geoffda » Fri Feb 14, 2020 8:50 pm

Hi Isem,

I looked at both videos and I am wondering if your issues could be set up related. Your left foot looks like it could be too strong and your right foot looks cuff-strong to me. If that is the case, it would explain why you are pushing your skis away at the start of the turn on turns to the right. On turns to the left, the right ski looks like it is trying to rail, perhaps because you are fighting the cuff. It appears that you finally win the battle when the knee slams over, but that could be why you end up with an a-frame on that side. At the level you are skiing at, small changes in alignment can have large effects on your skiing. It might be worthwhile to start experimenting.

On the right boot, try softening the cuff by about a 5 minute turn on the medial side of the boot. Before you try adjusting the cuff, mark the current location with a Sharpie pen so that you can undo what you try.

On the left boot, you really need some temporary shims to play around with. If you can, start by tipping yourself in 1.5 degrees on the left. That is probably too much, but if you are, in fact, too strong, doing this should eliminate the pushing away of the left ski at the start of turns to the right. Assuming it does, then you can refine from there, testing 1/2 a degree and 1 degree. If you don't have shims, I'm not sure what to tell you.

Anyway, if you can make the changes, get some video. If the results are positive, you will know that you are on the right track.
User avatar
geoffda
 
Posts: 859
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 10:42 am
Location: Copper Mountain, CO

Re: MA request for lsem

Postby lsem » Wed Oct 07, 2020 5:04 am

Hi geoffda,

Sorry, it is really long reply. I am very appreciate your response. Taking your advice I contacted Diana and provided some recent videos. She confirmed that it might worth a bit of experimenting with canting and shims. I think I could screw up canting settings when I increased forward lean.
Will be experimenting with it. Thank you for valuable piece of advice!
lsem
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri May 11, 2018 8:07 am

Re: MA request for lsem

Postby lsem » Thu Feb 11, 2021 2:33 pm

Hi PMTS community,

I am back with some videos. Recently I had slope suitable for practicing power releases and would like to show how it looks. I was a bit surprised to see that legs are not as wide as needed, is it very important?
I also think what I'm doing is not about releasing power but rather bending inside leg. I.e. I should releases stance leg slower. But I'm not sure and would appreciate comments from coaches.





Regarding recommended tasks.. I worked on releases in general and reread everything I found related to the question. One day experienced something like revelation, when after practicing releases I went to steeper slope to free ski and have some fun. In one turn when releasing I relaxed not only stance leg but entire body. It was beautiful sensation -- the feeling of weightlessness and having ski tips going down. Just wanted to share this with someone who knows that feeling. Now release is my favorite part in studying skiing and I think it has great potential for experiments. Thank you kindly Harald, Max and other guys here for MA.

While my tipping and overall skiing is still far from what I want it to be (first review of videos after skiing is totally disappointing as always), I have something what I found new in my skiing and would like to ask about and verify/confirm.

Here I have some turns, where I have skis consistently go ahead of the body when I release:


This happens anytime when slope is steeper and I release near diagonal line to the fall line (45 degrees). In this situation, even without rebound, released skis go faster than body. So I basically tip and pull both feet back in the air and land with edges already set and mostly balanced fore-aft. While this does not seem that bad I find it very different to `super phantom` transition. So my questions are:
1) Is this OK to ski like that? I personally find it fast and fun.
2) Can we ski with super phantom type transition instead in similar situation (release at 45 degrees, and/or steeper/steep slope). If so, how? More gradual release and don't let skis go? I believe I have seen racers in GS have both type of transitions during single run.

And sorry if this is just some nonsense, that is how my learning process works.
lsem
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri May 11, 2018 8:07 am

Previous

Return to Movement Analysis and Video

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests