"Non-pure" PMTS turns (version 2.0)

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"Non-pure" PMTS turns (version 2.0)

Postby tommy » Sun Apr 11, 2004 1:45 am

(I've put this in a new thread b/c the original one faded away off topic)

Harald wrote:
Brushed carves or skidded turns are achieved in PMTS by changing the duration and intensity of tipping. If I have speed and momentum, I can choose to carve or brush my turn, by how quickly and how much I tip my skis. If I tilt my skis to only 25% of what is necessary to achieve lock carve and I don?t extend the legs to create pressure; I get skidded turns.


Isn't the key here really how quickly and how "hard" (angle, pressure) you ENGAGE the stance ski ? In other words, if your tipping input of the free foot is substantial, then your hips will be pulled deep into the turn, creating high edge angles. Those high edge angles, in conjunction with increasing the pressure on the new stance ski, will create a carved turn.

Whereas for a brushed turn, you would still want to be quick tipping the free ski, to shorten the turn, but not allowing the stance ski to engage as forcefully, eg by keeping it more flexed, to allow it to brush.

Comments ?

--T
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Postby Ott Gangl » Sun Apr 11, 2004 8:47 am

It's called edge control. I presume you are talking about advanced skiers, as in
" how quickly and how "hard" (angle, pressure) you ENGAGE the stance ski ? In other words, if your tipping input of the free foot is substantial, then your hips will be pulled deep into the turn, creating high edge angles.


A skier needs to be able to have enough edge control to change a carve to a drift during the turn or vice versa. One of the main problems I have seen with the new shaped skis is that skiers dive into "a hard carve with hips pulled into the turn creating high edge angles" that they are unable to get out of this carve DURING the turn and create a tip drift or tail drift to get them where they want to go.

If they aim for a certain spot that is somewhat lower than the carve would take them, even if they elongate the carve, they need to throw in a quick extra turn, while if they were in balance without total hip commitment they could brush the tips and do a short drift to get them there.

From what I have heard, the inability to get out of a hard carve is what made Sonny Bono and some others hit obstacles, whereas we usually think of losing control as the inability to be on edge and thus gaining speed and losing direction control.

But that may not be where you were heading with you post, but I don't care with which system, or no system, you learn edge control, just master it because that is really all that counts, make the skis do what you want them to do.

Regards...and Happy Easter.

....Ott
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Postby Harald » Sun Apr 11, 2004 9:56 am

There are two different approaches being discussed here. What I am describing with the ?duration and intensity of tipping? is for slower, rounder, yet still edged turns. These turns are not intended to be to lock-out pure carved truns. This application is likely used in round bumps and steeps to keep speed under control.

If you are skiing aggressively making short turns on steep and you are still trying to get a pure carve, you may end up with a brushed carve even if you are giving full pressure and edge angle, because the radius is too sharp for the side cut of the ski.
Harald
 


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