Limited joint movements

Limited joint movements

Postby Tommi » Wed Jan 16, 2008 6:35 am

What are the options for improving travel of joints/movements with limited range? I would guess that it's good to have the supporting muscles in good shape, but does it even make sense trying to improve the actual movement range, or is it usually even physically possible?
An example could be a hip joint with limited rotation inwards. It's really nasty when I feel that I just can't counter enough to one side :roll:

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Postby rlspalding » Fri Jan 18, 2008 7:41 am

I dont know about skiing, but typically in any physical work, its always best to increase your range of motion (its called stretching). Its not really joints that you are stretching but Tendons and ligaments, and increasing muscle travel. This is why someone who was very athletic when they were younger can lose it later in life. If you don't continue using their full range, they will tighten up. So if you stretch to increase your range of motion, you will see a noticeable difference over time. At the same time if you quit, you will tighten back up.

This is also important if you are doing weight work outs. If you dont use the full range of motion, you will find that your muscles will develop oddly (even a word?). Have you ever seen a guy with massive biceps but his arms are permanently stuck at almost a 90 degree at the elbow? This is typical of guys who only focus on his biceps but also especially someone who does a bunch of curls incorrectly. they are "cheating" by not straightening his arms out during his exercise. Then what happens is the muscle grows and tightens so much that they cant bend their arm straight again.

Just be very careful when doing these to not overstrain, very painful. If you have the inclination and money, working with a physical therapist who specializes in sports medicine could be extremely beneficial in teaching you proper exercises to stretch what ever area you are interested in.
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Re: Limited joint movements

Postby rstraker » Wed Nov 19, 2008 7:10 pm

Tommi wrote:What are the options for improving travel of joints/movements with limited range? I would guess that it's good to have the supporting muscles in good shape, but does it even make sense trying to improve the actual movement range, or is it usually even physically possible?
An example could be a hip joint with limited rotation inwards. It's really nasty when I feel that I just can't counter enough to one side :roll:

T2

I've been looking into various "range of movement" (ROM) / alignment / movement methods this year, to correct some postural issues (higher left shoulder, higher right hip, etc.) and am hopeful that my improved alignment and movement will help me improve and balance my PMTS movements. I started with the Egoscue Method. Relatively expensive and time-intensive but have seen some nice changes over 4 months of workouts. You can check it out at http://www.egoscue.com or in the books Pain Free or Health Through Motion..., both by Pete Egoscue. He's had some stunning successes, including Jack Nicklaus.

Recently, though, I've been learning about Z Health, another movement methodology that holds the promise of working really fast. I've just begun using the "R-Phase" DVD and have learned that the whole system is built on simple joint mobilization exercises. Check out this article and especially the audio download that tells his personal story: http://www.dragondoor.com/wz01.html.

You can also check out the Z Health website (http://www.zhealth.net) or by Googling "Z Health" and "Eric Cobb."

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Re: Limited joint movements

Postby tburtonwire » Fri Dec 05, 2008 9:07 am

Tight muscles can limit joint movement. One of the best ways to loosen up tight muscles is through self-myofacial release using a foam roller, followed by stretching. This is great to do before and after exercising to get the muscles to release. I use it on the dock each morning before I waterski. It is also great if you have sore muscles from a nasty crash.
I have attached an article from NASM that explains foam rolling. You can get these at most sporting good store and Target. I can't live without mine.

http://www.nasm.org/nasmpro/fittools.as ... _0_11752_4
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Re: Limited joint movements

Postby rstraker » Sun Feb 07, 2010 5:32 pm

One of the interesting new methodologies for improving quality and range of movement is Z-Health (http://www.zhealth.net). As I understand it, it's based on the idea that your nervous system -- and not just the flexibility of your muscles and connective tissue -- has a lot of impact on your functional flexibility and the quality of your movement. And joint mobilization is the quickest way to stimulate the "mechanoreceptors" in your joints that influence your flexibility and movement.

Check it out:

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Re: Limited joint movements

Postby mvalbusa » Sun Dec 26, 2010 4:49 am

A really good way to CONSISTENTLY increase your range of motion, relatively inexpensive and with group support ---> YOGA!!!
I can't expand on it enough.. Give it a try for about 6 months 3 times a week minimum.
You will be a different person. :wink:
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Re: Limited joint movements

Postby kirtland » Sun Dec 26, 2010 9:26 pm

Normal Yoga apparently is not good for everyone. I thought it would be good for me, who has relatively advanced osteoarthritis for my age (63) in my spine and hips. I tried it for a few months last year and began to have more and more problems, with excruciating muscle spasms, I thought I could work through it. The physical therapist who owned the health center where I was taking the Yoga classes, finally told me that Yoga is not for everybody, and referred me to one of her physical therapists that specialized in back, hip and arthritis problems. My laymen's understanding of his explanation of the problem, and anecdotal experience is, that when I move one of my arthritic joints too far it irritates and inflames the tissue, which then tightens the surrounding muscle, which aggravates the joints more, and so on. I have been told by my other health professionals that I am expecting too much, that the problem is not with my muscles, that it with the joints and that part is going to continue to deteriorate. Which is a hard pill to swallow.
So although I need to stretch consistently, to remain mobile, it is nowhere near what is done in a Yoga class. The best thing I have found is 1/2 an hour 3 times a week on a rowing machine, along with my other exercise. It seems to be the right combination of stretching and strengthening for the back and hips, to keep me mobile and somewhat comfortable.
The good thing about the Yoga class is it got my wife doing it, and she loves it. And I got allot out of the breathing exercises. But it is not a panacea for everyone. In spite of what the Yoga zealots, believe. I wish it were. My advice is to consult with a health professional, in sports medicine, if you have joint problems.
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