Stephane - MA Request

Stephane - MA Request

Postby sym95734 » Fri Dec 09, 2016 8:29 am

Hi,

I took my first lesson at Harb Skis Camp (Short Turn) this last November. I think I could flex a lot more, this was my #1 challenge. I really enjoyed the camp and special thanks to Diana Rogers and Geoff Darst, great instructors.
Thanks!

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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby apache67 » Fri Dec 09, 2016 2:43 pm

Are those Head Magnum skis?? :)
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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby sym95734 » Fri Dec 09, 2016 3:21 pm

Head i.Speed super shape
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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby milesb » Sun Dec 11, 2016 9:58 am

I don't think a MA would be very productive, seeing as you had great in person instruction. What would be helpful to forum members is for you to describe the instruction you had, and how that worked for you.
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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby Bob_Y » Sun Jan 01, 2017 9:41 pm

Hi Stephane,

You've identified that flexing is an issue. I agree, but I think your problem runs a little deeper. If you plug the time encoded URL into your browser, the video will start a fraction of a second before the issue I will describe:

https://youtu.be/R4DxuXNvzsI

Your transition really begins, not with a flex but more of an old fashion "edge set". Notice how the stance ski (your left one) pushes out and the edge angle increases and creates an A-frame? You're using this motion to step your way into the new turn. A proper flex-to-release transition requires that you be solidly balanced over the stance ski. I don't think you have this yet, particularly on your left leg. If you look closely I think you will see this symptom on other turns in this sequence as well.

I would recommend the good old phantom move. Work on this until you feel you can do it equally well on both sides. You're probably right handed and a weak off hand leg is nothing unusual.

If you have the books or other resources you should review the mechanics of the phantom move. In short: lift, tip, pull back and in. This drill will clean up some other issues that are evident as well.

To reiterate, your lack of balance transfer is inhibiting your ability to flex and release the ski. If the end of your turn doesn't feel solid (i.e. balanced) you won't have the confidence to pull off a proper transition.

Best of luck!

Bob
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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby Max_501 » Mon Jan 02, 2017 3:39 pm

Bob_Y wrote:To reiterate, your lack of balance transfer is inhibiting your ability to flex and release the ski.


We don't need to transfer balance to flex and release. For example, in a weighted release there is no transfer of balance from one ski to the other.
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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby sgarrozzo » Tue Jan 03, 2017 10:49 am

Hello Max, first of all best wishes for the New Year to you and all members of the forum. Then I wanted to say hello to Bob_y who joined the forum on Wed March 5, 2008 9:53 am. And after sleeping for nine years this is his first message. Immediately guillotined by our Max. Hi Bob don't get upset, our Max is a little short sometimes, but is a good fellow you know. :D :D

We expect other MA from you!! :D
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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby Bob_Y » Tue Jan 03, 2017 2:01 pm

Thanks sgarrozzo for the friendly greeting. I don't often check in with the forum but did the other day and saw Stephane's MA request and no one stepping up to help so I offered my analysis of what I think is a fairly obvious and common problem.

I stand by my analysis and advise Stephane to try what I suggested. When you have to push on your stance foot at the end of the turn and hang onto the big toe edge through transition this is a sure sign that you weren't balanced on that edge to begin with.

As for Max501's comments... well, I guess this is why I participate in this forum so infrequently.
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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby Mac » Tue Jan 03, 2017 8:15 pm

I very seldom post on this forum anymore, especially when it comes to MA. But when I watched Stephane"s MA, it reminded me of a private lesson I took with Harald years ago. He shot some very similar video of me, and really hammered home a lack of an effective release. He also commented that I was somewhat stronger on my right side than the left, but I think that's pretty common with most people. I think that Stephane may be guilty of being a little camera shy, I know I stiffen up when someone is filming me. I always say that if you really want to get an accurate MA of someone's skiing, film them when they don't know you are. But all and all, I think that was some pretty nice skiing. IMO, the type of release you use is somewhat dictated by the conditions, bumps, powder, groomed, etc. But I did notice there was an area in the transition where a little more active release, transfer and engagement as Bob_Y had suggested might have been beneficial.
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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby Max_501 » Tue Jan 03, 2017 10:10 pm

Mac wrote:I think that Stephane may be guilty of being a little camera shy, I know I stiffen up when someone is filming me.


How do you know you stiffen up when being filmed?
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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby Mac » Wed Jan 04, 2017 1:16 pm

Written by someone who knows more on the subject than I do (and most people for that matter):

"If technique is the science of skiing, then style is the art. It’s possible to be very stylish in your approach to skiing but have a weaker technique. The converse is also true: Too much focus on technique can leave your skiing with an unappealing, boxy or rigid look.
Style is very different from technique, but you need both. Don’t let style affect your technique, and don’t be so focused on technique that your skiing doesn’t have any style."

As for your question, I already answered that, so no need to do it again.
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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby h.harb » Wed Jan 04, 2017 7:26 pm

I guess you experts all missed the MA?? Whether you like it or not, you can't release if you don't hold or create your counter acting. These turns are all rotated, so anyone from PSIA or CSIA won't see it. Sure bury your head in the snow and ignore what I post and go back to where you are an expert to some people. It doesn't change the facts, which are, you can't see what is really wrong! I didn't say it nicely, so many will point out that Harb is an asshole, but an asshole who can see what is to be fixed in skiing. Hey, Happy New and enjoy our president, he's direct and abrupt; as well, so you should be used to Trumpisums here on this forum by me.
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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby Max_501 » Thu Jan 05, 2017 7:33 am

Mac wrote:Written by someone who knows more on the subject than I do (and most people for that matter)"


No idea why you quoted an non-PMTS instructor in the PMTS MA forum or how his ideas regarding style relate to this thread, but here is a quote from HH on style.

h.harb wrote:PMTS doesn't take away your ability to have your own personal style. Style is different than "function", it's personal and has to do with "flexibility" , a certain way you hold your arms and hands and your body proportions. The biggest difference is flexibility. Diana and I rarely stiffen up during the curve of the arc, we continue tipping movements with appropriate counter acting throughout the turn and range of the arc.. Especially noticeable on steep slopes. This gives our asking a relaxed flowing look.


When working on MA we look at the movements, identify the SMIM, and suggest drills that will target the SMIM. Style has nothing to do with it.
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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby B.Mulligan » Thu Jan 05, 2017 10:11 am

Mac wrote:Written by someone who knows more on the subject than I do (and most people for that matter):

"If technique is the science of skiing, then style is the art. It’s possible to be very stylish in your approach to skiing but have a weaker technique. The converse is also true: Too much focus on technique can leave your skiing with an unappealing, boxy or rigid look.
Style is very different from technique, but you need both. Don’t let style affect your technique, and don’t be so focused on technique that your skiing doesn’t have any style."



Ok, I had to look that up, I would have swore it was from Lito 8)


Nope, it's Canadian Lito! :D

Oh, so with the above video, what was the MA or SMIM? What did your coaches say your SMIM was in camp?
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Re: Stephane - MA Request

Postby geoffda » Thu Jan 05, 2017 12:15 pm

Hi Stephane,

Happy New Year! As Harald alluded to, spend some time working on counteracting--both making the movement and then holding your counteracting as you transition to new edges. On turns to the right you generally have some counteracting, but you don't always hold it. On turns to the left, your hips are following your skis (which is rotation). You also have no counterbalance on that side.

You definitely need to work on flexing the old stance leg to get a release, but unless you have counteracting (and are holding it at the turn finish), it is extremely difficult to get that moment of little-toe-edge balance on the old free foot that must happen as part of a two-footed (or one-footed) type of release. If you try to relax your old stance leg, but you don't have LTE balance, the new stance ski will flatten prematurely as the transfer happens and you will end up in a wedge. At that point, your old stance ski is still on edge and that leg is blocking your center of mass from moving into the new turn. To overcome that, the natural instinct is to extend the new stance leg and push your center of mass into the new turn, which is not what you want.

So, if you spend some time honing your counteracting skills first, you should find it easier to develop your ability to flex into a release. That said, there is some chicken and egg here. When you aggressively extend your new stance leg to start the turn, that movement will cause hip rotation. You have to break that cycle, so you may have to pay some attention to toning down the extension in order to achieve success in your counteracting work.

"Angry Mother" is a good drill to start with. I believe we worked on that at camp? If not, there is a great video series demonstrating this drill on the Harb Ski Systems web site.
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