What happens with my inside foot?

What happens with my inside foot?

Postby Carl R » Sun Aug 21, 2016 1:46 pm

Videos from last winter. Slope was perfect ice and edges crazy sharp.
The outer ski was on rails. However, it seems I let the inside ski just skid with a different angle.
I felt it happening later during the season. Why is it happening?



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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby Max_501 » Sun Aug 21, 2016 9:30 pm

What skis are you on?
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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby Carl R » Mon Aug 22, 2016 11:27 am

Atomic GS r<35
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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby Max_501 » Mon Aug 22, 2016 6:15 pm

Please review this thread, Getting r<=30-35 to turn?
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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby Carl R » Mon Aug 22, 2016 10:01 pm

FWIW i have all the books.
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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby ToddW » Tue Aug 23, 2016 1:08 pm

Carl,

There are still openings in the second Hintertux session at the end of March. Part of the challenge for a skier like you is to slow down and work deliberately on your skiing foundation; a focused one-week camp is a good place to start that.
.
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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby Carl R » Sat Aug 27, 2016 12:44 pm

So, my question is; what happens with my inside foot?

Skiing very slowly, with skidding turns; making the inside ski tip grip is what starts the rotation afaik.
I think this is a rest product of it.

Is it a problem in higher speeds? Should I use the inside ski differently?
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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby Max_501 » Sat Aug 27, 2016 12:50 pm

Carl R wrote:So, my question is; what happens with my inside foot?


You aren't balanced over the outside ski. This post still applies -

Max_501 wrote:Get on something with a radius of 12-14M and work on tipping and inside foot management with a strong focus on establishing balance on the outside ski. Once you have that nailed move up to a 24M GS ski and work on the same thing. Keep in mind that it took the best racers in the world a season or two to figure out how to carve a 35 like it was a GS ski.
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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby Carl R » Sat Aug 27, 2016 1:07 pm

Max_501 wrote:
Carl R wrote:So, my question is; what happens with my inside foot?


You aren't balanced over the outside ski. This post still applies -

Max_501 wrote:Get on something with a radius of 12-14M and work on tipping and inside foot management with a strong focus on establishing balance on the outside ski. Once you have that nailed move up to a 24M GS ski and work on the same thing. Keep in mind that it took the best racers in the world a season or two to figure out how to carve a 35 like it was a GS ski.


The strange thing is that even if I ski with the inside ski lifted; if the inside ski tip touches the snow, the above happens.
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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby A.L.E » Sat Aug 27, 2016 11:23 pm

Test your outside ski balance. Can you lift your inside ski at any point in the turn?
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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby Carl R » Sun Aug 28, 2016 6:33 am

A.L.E wrote:Test your outside ski balance. Can you lift your inside ski at any point in the turn?

Yes.
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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby Max_501 » Sun Aug 28, 2016 7:44 am

In the videos above, by the apex of the turn the inside ski is the base of support so lifting it would cause a fall.

h.harb wrote:If your tips and feet go wider when carving turns just before the release, the turn didn't happen. This is a sure fire sign that pressure was lost and weight went to the inside ski.
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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby Carl R » Sun Aug 28, 2016 11:20 am

Max_501 wrote:In the videos above, by the apex of the turn the inside ski is the base of support so lifting it would cause a fall.

h.harb wrote:If your tips and feet go wider when carving turns just before the release, the turn didn't happen. This is a sure fire sign that pressure was lost and weight went to the inside ski.


I did the drills you suggested in the other thread. A lot. Inside foot up, tip pressure. It was after those drills that the inside ski tip started to drift more and more into the turn.

However, the drills made the outside ski turn. There was a huge difference.
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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby Max_501 » Sun Aug 28, 2016 11:40 am

Carl R wrote:Inside foot up, tip pressure.


What do you mean by tip pressure?

For reference -

Max_501 wrote:Here's the MA from Jay (Black Level PMTS Coach) and I back in 2012. We can see the same things with the GS skis but magnified. If you want to bend a GS ski you have to get off the inside ski.

Max_501 wrote:Carl, excellent job of flexing the inside leg and getting the inside foot out of the way! If you worked on inside foot tipping so it kept up with the inside leg flexion you would have more control over the turn. As it is, the inside foot gets out of the way and then the hips fall into the new turn (this is what others are seeing as hip dumping), with the inside foot following rather than leading the hips.

On a gentle slope work on inside foot tipping range of motion. Keep in mind that flexing will increase the tipping range of motion.

Also work on pulling the inside foot back and holding it closer to the stance boot/leg to increase balance and help minimize falling onto the inside ski.



I know I sound like a broken record but...

Inside foot management = pull back to stance boot, pull in to stance boot, tip to LTE

Spend some time working on the Super phantom with touch-tilt:

As in a regular super phantom, transfer balance to LTE of the uphill ski. Then, touch the inside edge of the lifted, dowhnill ski to the inside ankle rivet of the stance boot ("inside foot arch touches outside foot ankle"). Keep it touching while tipping the free foot further toward its LTE. Don't let that free foot touch the snow until the very end of the turn. VERY IMPORTANT STEP! At the end of the turn, when the free foot touches the snow on its LTE, immediately pick up the new free foot, and touch-tilt the new stance boot.

When learning, you can begin with keeping the tip of the free ski on the snow, but the goal is to keep the whole ski lifted throughout the turn which is a true test of your ability to balance on the outside ski.

Teach the Pole Press drill (pages 68 - 69 of book 2) to one of your friends and ask them to spend a few minutes working with you so you get the feel for the muscular effort needed to keep the inside foot under control.
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Re: What happens with my inside foot?

Postby Carl R » Sun Aug 28, 2016 12:44 pm

Max_501 wrote:
Carl R wrote:Inside foot up, tip pressure.


What do you mean by tip pressure?



When pulling free foot back, tip pressure happens.
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