MA Request for dwanjr

Re: MA Request for dwanjr

Postby cheesehead » Fri Feb 26, 2016 9:39 am

Zooming would really help. You should be filling up the frame as you go by the camera.
--- aka John Carey
Madison, Wisconsin
cheesehead
 
Posts: 274
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2009 3:42 pm

Re: MA Request for dwanjr

Postby DougD » Fri Feb 26, 2016 3:20 pm

Video quality aside...

I don't see total commitment to the outside ski through the entire turn. As you move through the apex and belly of each turn, your stance widens and you lean inside into a two footed stance. It's impossible to increase tipping effectively when doing that (trust me - I know!) So...

#1 thing to work on is balancing COMPLETELY on the LTE of the new stance foot during transition. You must be able to do this in both directions at s-l-o-w speeds. It takes practice... hours and hours of practice.

#2 Once you're doing that reliably in both directions, lift the free ski slightly off the snow and tip so that the ski edge beneath your instep is touching the stance boot just below the ankle rivet. Hold it there and keep tipping so it stays there throughout the ENTIRE turn. Practice until you can do this reliably in both directions. Again, try to practice this at much slower speeds.

#3 Near the bottom of the turn, the instant your free ski LTE brushes the snow - IMMEDIATELY flex the stance leg and transfer weight to that LTE. Now you're back at #1... repeat.

Practicing these (Super Phantoms with Touch Tilt) until you can link them reliably at slow speeds will greatly improve your one-footed balance.

Bonus MA: your CA is being undone by your pole plants, which are too active and involve excessive arm swinging and reaching (in the wrong direction). The best cure for this is to STOP pole planting altogether. Pole Plants are a distraction and a real bar to improvement until you've nailed #1, 2 and 3 above. For now, hold your poles so they're vertical with both tips brushing the snow through the entire turn. Keep pushing both tips forward (using only your wrists) so the poles don't get swept backwards. Avoid active pole use until foot movements and balance are under control in PMTS fashion.

As always, if a more qualified PMTS skier or coach chimes in, their advice trumps mine.
DougD
 
Posts: 572
Joined: Thu Apr 10, 2014 6:22 am
Location: Connecticut, USA

Re: MA Request for dwanjr

Postby dwanjr » Sat Feb 27, 2016 11:16 am

Yeah, I keep telling her to zoom before she starts recording me. It's all I've got for video right now though and I thought it's slightly better than nothing.

DougD,

Thanks for your comments! I will continue to work on my outside ski balance. I was noticing that separation of my feet after the apex of the turn as well. That would definitely explain some of the difficulty I was having while trying to increase my tipping. The CA being undone by my pole plant also would explain why my stance ski would sometimes slide out from under me; if my CA was being compromised that, combined with a lack of full commitment to my stance ski, would cause the edge to not hold as well as it should.

I was doing similar exercises to what you suggested on my second day this season. I was doing them very slowly as I was skiing with my sister then who was just having her third day skiing ever. I definitely felt more solid after doing those. My wife usually just wants to ski fast and rarely wants to work on technique. She knows I'm constantly working on trying to improve my technique though so maybe she'll slow down for some runs to take some (better) video for me. She's not practicing PMTS despite my attempts so I don't really ask her for feedback on my skiing, other if it looks consistent and if she can tell what I'm working on.
dwanjr
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2008 12:05 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: MA Request for dwanjr

Postby dwanjr » Wed Jun 05, 2019 11:23 pm

Hey, everyone! I have posted a new video of my skiing and I would like some feedback on my progress. It is the first video I was able to get of my skiing since 2016. This amounts to less than 30 days of on snow practice since then. My equipment has completely changed as I am now skiing on Head Supershape iSpeeds in a 170 length and Lange RS130 wide boots (size 27.0). Since my thread about my boots, I have had some more work done on them, including cuff alignment, and it feels like they're getting closer but I still have some pain and numbness while wearing them.

In the video, I was concentrating on making consistent short turns the entire time. The video was shot on the World Cup Downhill run, a blue run, at Sunshine Village in Banff, Alberta, Canada on May 11th, 2019. There was very nice spring skiing conditions that day.

I apologize for the low video resolution; my brother-in-law shot the video on his cellphone and I did not realize his video resolution was set so low. He also stated that due to how bright it was, he had trouble seeing the screen, which is why I almost end up off screen at one point halfway through the video. I appreciate any feedback that you guys could provide. I've included my own MA (limited as it is) of the video below as well. Hopefully I'm not too far off in my MA. Thanks in advance!




Is the stance width appropriate for the size of the skier? I believe so, though I do narrow my stance toward the end of the video.
Does the release start by flexing the outside leg? For most of the turns.
Is there a transfer to the LTE? I can see an O frame in some of the turns, but it's hard to see for other turns.
Does LTE tipping lead engagement to the new turn? Again on some turns but I don't see it consistently.
Is there a point in the transition where both legs are flexed equally? Yes.
Are the feet pulled back at transition? This has been something I have been focussing on but I don't see it happening consistently.
Is the inside foot held back throughout the turn? Yes, but this might be due to how quick the turns are.
Is there enough CB and CA and is the timing right? For the turns in the video, yes? I feel the timing may be late on this though.
Is the pelvis included in the CB/CA movement Inside hip higher? I think the pelvis is included in CB but I think any CA is from the upper body and the pelvis remains more or less square in most turns.
Strong inside arm, pole tip moving forward? It looks like my arms may still be an issue, despite my efforts to keep them under control.
Is the inside leg flexing and tipping as the turn progresses? There is some flexing and tipping but I don't think it progresses throughout the turn. I think there could be more of both.
Does the outside leg extend naturally (no pushing) as the turn progresses? I believe so as I was not trying to push the skis around.
Does LTE tipping of the inside foot continue throughout the turn? In the turns at the end of the video, yes, but otherwise, I'm not sure.
Does the weight shift go to the LTE during transition? Not consistently.
Is the skier balanced over the outside ski? When the right foot is the stance ski, yes. When the left is the stance ski, not consistently.
Is there a pole touch and how is the movement and timing? Yes, but movement might be excessive. The timing seems ok.
Is the pole touch a no swing? No.
Alignment - watch the skis and knees carefully - does anything look like it needs go be tipped in or out? They seem to be even but this could again be due to the speed of the turns.
dwanjr
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2008 12:05 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Re: MA Request for dwanjr

Postby noobSkier » Thu Jun 06, 2019 1:10 pm

Hard to tell with the quality of the video, but you can clearly see at least one wedge entry at 11s. There is certainly a wedge entry (at the very least a strong tail-push) present in every turn based on fact that there is no flexing or LTE transfer. All of this indicates a tipping deficiency. There is no chance of developing correct upper body movements or flexing movements without first getting your tipping right. Luckily this is easily resolved with slow and consistent tipping work.

Here is a skier showing (mostly) correct tipping movements after a week of dedicated practice:


Notice how slowly this skier is practicing...this is about 100x more difficult than the skiing in your clip. Also notice the roundness of the arcs vs the skidded zig-zags in your skiing.

Overall I think you are an athletic skier and you should respond quickly to good practice. It's really great that you posted. I strongly recommend harb-carvers for practicing tipping in the summer...they work wonders.
User avatar
noobSkier
 
Posts: 360
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2016 8:35 am
Location: Quebec, Canada

Re: MA Request for dwanjr

Postby h.harb » Fri Jun 07, 2019 1:13 pm

Your biggest missing "essential" is tipping your feet to put the skis on edge. There is lots of twisting, (hips and push off) to turn the skis, but little angle creation. Start tipping your feet before any attempts are made to turn your skis.
User avatar
h.harb
 
Posts: 6772
Joined: Sat Feb 03, 2007 2:08 pm
Location: Dumont, Colorado

Re: MA Request for dwanjr

Postby razie » Thu Jun 20, 2019 2:24 pm

It may sound weird to hear that there's no tipping, after all, there is some (mistimed) flexion, there is some appearance of the feet swinging side to side etc... but if you look really closely, especially as you pass the camera, you'll notice that the flexing is not what ends the turn - but the hips are. Likewise, tipping is not what's driving the angle creation in the new turn, the hips are.

Look carefully as a turn ends and you'll notice how the hips are the first thing to move into the new turn, not the tipping foot. After the hips get going, then the feet are pushed around to do whatever it takes to catch the hips on the other side... so... tipping is your SMIM :shock:
User avatar
razie
 
Posts: 87
Joined: Fri Aug 31, 2012 6:40 am
Location: Q mon capitain

Previous

Return to Movement Analysis and Video

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest