MA for Matt 2014

MA for Matt 2014

Postby Matt » Mon Apr 07, 2014 1:32 am

Really bad winter in Sweden this year. Basically no skiing where I live so I was limited to a few trips to higher altitudes this year.

Anyway, I managed to get my son to shoot some video during a trip this weekend. Please tear me a new one :)

The video requires password=PMTS

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Re: MA for Matt 2014

Postby Max_501 » Mon Apr 07, 2014 5:02 pm

Matt, how do you feel about your inside foot management?
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Re: MA for Matt 2014

Postby Matt » Mon Apr 07, 2014 10:00 pm

Max_501 wrote:Matt, how do you feel about your inside foot management?

Thanks for responding Max
Inside foot tipping has been my number one problem from the day I first saw myself on video. I have a huge mobility problem in the foot joint, particularly in the left foot.

In the video I tip the inside foot as hard as I can but it is not enough to get parallel shins obviously. Inside foot tipping is something I think about in probably 50% of my skiing time. I have some pretty big alignments done in the video, 3 degrees shimming out on both sides, as well as some varus adjustment. I don´t dare to do more before I see a pmts boot fitter. I hope to be able to go to Hintertux next year for this.

I also notice, particularly when the left foot is the inside, that I have diverging skis early in the turn. Not sure if this is related to the tipping problem or if I could make it go away with harder pull-back?

The alignment I have done (together with a local boot fitter but I don´t think he really knows what he is doing) has at least improved things a bit. This is from 2 years ago, before I knew that I needed alignement:

password=PMTS

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Re: MA for Matt 2014

Postby HighAngles » Tue Apr 08, 2014 5:54 am

Matt wrote:
Max_501 wrote:Matt, how do you feel about your inside foot management?

I also notice, particularly when the left foot is the inside, that I have diverging skis early in the turn. Not sure if this is related to the tipping problem or if I could make it go away with harder pull-back?

I believe Max was specifically referring to the very large amount of inside foot lead present in these turns.
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Re: MA for Matt 2014

Postby Matt » Tue Apr 08, 2014 6:31 am

HighAngles wrote:
Matt wrote:
Max_501 wrote:Matt, how do you feel about your inside foot management?

I also notice, particularly when the left foot is the inside, that I have diverging skis early in the turn. Not sure if this is related to the tipping problem or if I could make it go away with harder pull-back?

I believe Max was specifically referring to the very large amount of inside foot lead present in these turns.

Thanks HA,
Interesting, I had not noticed that.
In general reasons contributing to lead are non-parallel shins, too much counter and too wide stance.
I can see now that my shins are not parallel in the fore-aft plane and perhaps I get a bit wide at times. I don't think I use too much CA. More CA was what I was working on this day BTW.
So what do I do about it? I have a feeling that these problems are all related but I don't know what the SMIM is.

Edit: just to be clear, with "diverging" I was talking about the skis pointing in different directions, not displaced differently fore-aft.
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Re: MA for Matt 2014

Postby Max_501 » Tue Apr 08, 2014 8:17 am

I've noticed a trend where skiers are working on carving before they have mastered inside foot management. This leads to a variety of symptoms that all relate back to the lack of inside foot management.

Work on the Super phantom with touch-tilt:

As in a regular super phantom, transfer balance to LTE of the uphill ski. Then, touch the inside edge of the lifted, dowhnill ski to the inside ankle rivet of the stance boot ("arch touches ankle"). Keep it touching while tipping the free foot further toward its LTE. Don't let that free foot touch the snow until the very end of the turn. VERY IMPORTANT STEP! At the end of the turn, when the free foot touches the snow on its LTE, immediately pick up the new free foot, and touch-tilt the new stance boot.

When learning, you can begin with keeping the tip of the free ski on the snow, but the goal is to keep the whole ski lifted throughout the turn which is a true test of the skier's ability to balance on the outside ski.

Reread the Free Foot Management section of Book 2 to be sure you know what to look for when working on this. Start with the Pole Press drill (pages 68 - 69 of book 2) so you have a good understanding of the muscular effort needed to hold the free foot against the stance boot.
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Re: MA for Matt 2014

Postby Matt » Tue Apr 08, 2014 9:31 am

Thanks a lot Max. Now I have a clear focus. You are absolutely right that I jumped directly to carving. Probably because the first book was essentials.
This year I have spent a lot of time on SRTs though. I did however skip the ball hold drills in the free foot management chapter, and it seems it caught up with me.
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Re: MA for Matt 2014

Postby go_large_or_go_home » Tue Apr 08, 2014 10:21 am

Hey Matt,

Matt wrote:Edit: just to be clear, with "diverging" I was talking about the skis pointing in different directions, not displaced differently fore-aft.

It was explained to me that a divergent inside ski is indicative of weight still being placed on it....very easy to do as max says when we try to carve too early in our PMTS studies.

Prior to "any" alignment work carried out on my boots, I found it IMPOSSIBLE get my feet together, even on a straight run. Quite handy as it fitted in with my TTS dogma at the time...As soon as the boots were tweaked, I not only found that my feet naturally came closer together, but I was able to hold my inside ski edge tight up against my stance boot inside ankle rivet. So much was the change, and so instantaneous, I was shocked...in fact, I have deep cuts and gouges on both boots in the area of the inner ankle rivets...I am slightly concerned, at this rate, I will chop through the plastic.....
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Re: MA for Matt 2014

Postby Matt » Mon Apr 14, 2014 5:48 am

As proof of my dedication I now have a couple of new cuts in my pants. Didn't think about the fact that the pants go down over the rivets. :(
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Re: MA for Matt 2014

Postby Max_501 » Mon Apr 14, 2014 8:26 am

If your pants don't already have strong cuff guards you can add them with a good ballistic fabric.
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Re: MA for Matt 2014

Postby Matt » Mon Apr 14, 2014 9:39 pm

Max_501 wrote:If your pants don't already have strong cuff guards you can add them with a good ballistic fabric.

Thanks, I´ll do that. They have a guard but it was too narrow so the cuts were in front of it.
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Re: MA for Matt 2014

Postby go_large_or_go_home » Wed Apr 16, 2014 12:31 am

Max_501 wrote:If your pants don't already have strong cuff guards you can add them with a good ballistic fabric.


I had to do exactly that with the wife's ski pants after alighnment tweaks to her boots and changes to her movement patterns during our ski camp. She even managed to get one of her inside ski brakes caught up in one of the many cuts - lucky it didn't happen down a bump run....

Maybe sewing/ ski pant modification can be added to the Essentials list..... :D
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