MA for Matt

Re: MA for Matt

Postby SkierSynergy » Wed Mar 28, 2012 4:47 pm

Untill someone does the actual measurements on you, you can't know what is going on and what are the best adjustment needed for your situation in your boots
We see a lot of self diagnosers. Usually, They just mess things up worse.
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Re: MA for Matt

Postby ToddW » Wed Mar 28, 2012 6:03 pm

Matt,

Whatever you do for the coming season, try your best to make it to Hintertux next April and sign up for the alignment pre-day. This year, Hintertux filled up very quickly unlike previous years ... so be sure to register shortly after the schedule is posted (typically April or early May.) It's probably the only chance you have to ski with a skilled alignment specialist for 5 days, which gives lots of time to try out options to see what works best for you.

If your schedule doesn't allow for Hintertux, connect with Jasper and Guus at Portes du Ski in the Netherlands ( http://www.portesduski.nl/ ) Yes, the Netherlands -- they have a ski deck and travel for real snow. If your feet truly are in the medical mystery category, then Hintertux is a better option since Diana and Chris will be there. If you're not quite a medical mystery, the Portes du Ski guys can do a good job for you. Since they have a ski deck, they are a year-round operation and there's no need to wait for snow to get aligned. If you go to them, consider getting a PMTS lesson on their deck while you are there. Jasper is a very capable skier and instructor. In fact, starting last year he is one of the coaches at the Hintertux camp. (SkierSynergy, who has been giving you advice, is also a Hintertux coach.)

Good luck getting your alignment sorted out! It will make a world of difference in your skiing.
.
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Re: MA for Matt

Postby Matt » Thu Mar 29, 2012 12:59 am

SkierSynergy wrote:Untill someone does the actual measurements on you, you can't know what is going on and what are the best adjustment needed for your situation in your boots
We see a lot of self diagnosers. Usually, They just mess things up worse.

I'm doing measurements as outlined in ACBAES 1, but the problem is to perform the magic that takes these measurements and turn them into a proper fit.

If my best alternative is to go to tux in one year I don't really see that I have too much to loose given the F#&#%/ up setup I already have. As long as I don't modify the boots permanently I don't risk anything except my health. Physical AND mental.
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Re: MA for Matt

Postby SkierSynergy » Thu Mar 29, 2012 10:23 am

There is a list of measurements in ACBES 1 that are used in a full alignment analysis -- they are not all that is looked at. However, the list is just a quick description of some of the issues involved for general information. Actually carrying the measurements out on someone takes a lot of training -- none them can be done on yourself except maybe a general sense of tracking. So for the most part you can note that the foot seems to roll in or out and that the tracking is in or out. These are general symptoms and the more detailed list is an examination of the causes and potential interaction of causes. The measurements have to be good and the understanding has to be complete. Then there is the whole issue of what footbed and boot changes are best for each cause and relationship of causes. What to do with leg and hip issues betcome even more complicated. I don't know of any of the harb ski systems coaches that tries to do their own alignment. We all rely on experienced others to do the measuremnts, take the videos, etc.

General foot/ankle issues can be identified by a good podiatrist, physical therapist, or certified pedorthist -- they can tell you whether you have fore foot varus ( and how much), for example. However, the vast majority of them have no idea of how to address the issues for skiing. Most make the footbed/orthotic far to stiff. Of course they will not know what to do with the boots or canting of the boots.

This is not to say that you should not experiment some. Just concentrate on a few basic things that are more obvious. make sure you have a Footbde with some calcaneal accomodation and a deep heel pocket. Maybe some temproary support under the forefoot if it straightens your tracking. Make sure the footbed and its fit in the boot doesn't block the motion of your arch. Set the cuff angle correctly on the boot. Try some temp shims.
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Re: MA for Matt

Postby Matt » Thu Mar 29, 2012 12:48 pm

Thanks Jay, a lot of good advice. I´ve read most of the articles on your site now, and I think that I have a fairly good understanding about general foot issues, but as you say it doesn´t say so much about ski specific stuff. I´ve experimented with wedges under the forefoot, lateral cuff angle, shims and heel lifts. I did this in front of a mirror and measured different angles and range of motion with some laser tools I have for other engineering purposes so it is pretty accurate.

I have a measurement marker on top of the tibia, just below the knee. When I don´t correct anything I can tip this point only about 2 cm to the outside by lifting BTE hard, and I can tip 20 cm to the inside. With a 4 degree wedge under the forefoot and a significant heelrise (two comformable wedges, I have not measured them) I can tip almost 10 cm in both directions, and this is in spite the fact that the inversion/eversion RoM of the foot is limited because it becomes very tight with rise and wedge inside the Fischer vacuum boots.

My plan is to take this to the fitter that made my boots and present the results, and hopefully we can come to a reasonable setup together that I can use next year. Then if economy allows I will go to tux and meet some real experts next year. Well to be honest its more about convincing my wife that it is a good idea for me to go to tux :oops: .
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Re: MA for Matt

Postby Max_501 » Thu Mar 29, 2012 1:18 pm

Most of the measurements can't be done without the help of someone else because even small movements you make to take the measurements affect the results.
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Re: MA for Matt

Postby Matt » Thu Mar 29, 2012 10:20 pm

I have help but the mirror is still good to see what is going on.
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Re: MA for Matt, Video after alignment

Postby Matt » Mon Apr 23, 2012 8:35 am

Update after doing some significant boot adjustments. In the clip I have lifted both BTE sides 6 degrees! I also have a 1 cm heel lifter.
This was the first day skiing with the alignement and it felt quite different. Balance was not tuned in and the skis felt like they were very grippy and diverging all over the place.
I'll have to practice a lot more to get used I think, and also fine-tune the alignement, but this was my last skiing for the season.

The snow was soft spring snow that very easily break away when you put too much pressure on.

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Re: MA for Matt

Postby BigE » Mon Apr 23, 2012 8:22 pm

6 degrees OUT? Is this diy?

The maximum number degrees that you should try to move the knee out is 2 degrees.

The problem is that you put far too much pressure on the medial compartment. Essentially, you make 1/2 your knee bear all of the weight. This is nothing short of dangerous.

At least that is the recommendation from the M.D.s at CSIA/CSCF. It does not matter that they are CSIA, what matters is *they are medical doctors*.
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Re: MA for Matt

Postby Matt » Mon Apr 23, 2012 10:29 pm

Sorry, I was not clear. I have not moved the knee. The 6 degrees is varus adjustment. It was done by a fitter. Since the process involved remolding the vacuum boots he wanted to start with a big adjustment.
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Re: MA for Matt

Postby Max_501 » Tue Apr 24, 2012 3:37 pm

BigE wrote:The maximum number degrees that you should try to move the knee out is 2 degrees.

The problem is that you put far too much pressure on the medial compartment. Essentially, you make 1/2 your knee bear all of the weight. This is nothing short of dangerous.

At least that is the recommendation from the M.D.s at CSIA/CSCF. It does not matter that they are CSIA, what matters is *they are medical doctors*.


Do you have a link to their research?
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Re: MA for Matt

Postby jbotti » Mon Apr 30, 2012 10:47 am

BigE wrote:6 degrees OUT? Is this diy?

The maximum number degrees that you should try to move the knee out is 2 degrees.

The problem is that you put far too much pressure on the medial compartment. Essentially, you make 1/2 your knee bear all of the weight. This is nothing short of dangerous.

At least that is the recommendation from the M.D.s at CSIA/CSCF. It does not matter that they are CSIA, what matters is *they are medical doctors*.


Harald has me at 3.5 which maxes out what he could do on my dodge boots. I am currently skiing with an additional 2 degree shim on the heel of my right boot. That gets me to the 4.5 to 5 degree range, which is the right place for this leg. Bear in mind that my ankle is set wrong (from a displaced fracture) at 13 degrees out, so I require a huge adjustment. I will also say that it would be very bad for my knee to ski with anythung less than that. Contrary to what you are claiming, a properly aligned knee receives much less stress while skiing.
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