MA for HighAngles

Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby Ken » Fri Dec 09, 2011 1:13 pm

HA, do you continually tip the free foot more and more as the turn progresses? And tip it even more and quicker for tighter and faster turns?

What CB drills do you use? These work for me:
--Garlands on easy slopes where I start across the hill on the downhill edges, when I've arced to straight down switch to the other edges to arc across, switch to downhill edges to arc down, etc., etc. Switch directions--if you started to the right on the hill, now start to the left. As my balance improves I gradually increase the slope of the terrain.
--On moderate terrain ski the full arc with the tail of the free ski off the snow and progressively tipping the free ski more and more and more, keeping the tail off the snow. As I improve, I increase the terrain slope. Change weight to the new outside ski as the first movement for each turn (which makes this a weighted release, I guess).
When I'm balancing right, I feel like I'm balancing over just the inside edge of the outside ski.
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby HeluvaSkier » Sat Dec 10, 2011 1:12 am

Where you're at, it isn't as much about tipping as it is about collapsing the inside leg while you tip.

Do the power release drill. Then do it again.
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby jbotti » Sun Dec 11, 2011 11:07 am

HA, perfect the NSPP (No swing Pole Plant). Never ski anywhere at all, at any tme without keeping your hands and body in the prooper position for the NSPP. If you do this you will always have CA and CB in place in your skiing. When this is the case you can really focus on increasing your tipping and using your flexing and free foot pull backk to snap you into new turns. The NSPP is easier said than done and it requires huge work. I just finished skiing two days with Harald and we spent most of the time talking about how even he has to work hard to get back to having the NSPP in place at the beginning of everyseason. If Harald has to work on it himself for several days each season, it's cleary going to take more effort for the rest of us. But it is the key to CA and CB!!

Start on moderate terrain at slow speeds and make sure you allow your hips to open up and rotate (away from the turns) and have this create the CA forces, and no reaching to plant the pole as the pole tip shoould never be more forward that the back of your boot. If you keep your head over your stance ski, you will also get solid CB. Practice this unti it's in place everywhere and you will be a different skier (as I will be when I get there!!).

And lastly, get rid of those banana skis!!
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby geoffda » Sun Dec 11, 2011 3:30 pm

HeluvaSkier wrote:Where you're at, it isn't as much about tipping as it is about collapsing the inside leg while you tip.

Do the power release drill. Then do it again.


That was exactly what I told Faisal to tell you when he saw you. That and quit riding fat skis at Loveland :mrgreen: . I fear your job may be interfering with your tipping.
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby HighAngles » Sun Dec 11, 2011 5:53 pm

I have the Performance Free Skiing DVD and have watched the NSPP segment many times. It would be great, however, to see some video posted up of some of the other members using this technique. My only concern about the NSPP is that it seems to lead to very static/stiff looking skiing. Maybe my concern is totally off-base, but that's why I'd like to see more of it - to get a better understanding of the movements (or in this case "non-movements" :wink: ).

BTW - The skis in the second shot (blue jacket) are actually the Nordica Patron which I was demoing. I have a heck of a lot more time on sub-80mm waist skis. In fact the only time I have been on anything fatter than 76mm this season is when I was doing the demos.
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby HeluvaSkier » Sun Dec 11, 2011 7:27 pm

I wouldn't worry about the NSPP. IMO that is a fairly high level drill. I'd keep working on the feet (tipping and releasing) for now.
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby BigE » Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:28 am

Heluva is right.... Keep it simple. Flex, tip, pull back.

Make sure you feel strong cuff pressure. In the low angle pitch video, the turns are HUGE. To me, that says not enough tipping, not enough forward pressure on the ski. Tipping + forward pressure = pressure on the forward inside edge. Get that edge started and pull the foot back.

Before I'd worry about CA, I'd worry about CB....

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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby HighAngles » Sun Mar 24, 2013 5:46 am

This is the last video taken of me at the recent Super Blue camp. I decided it would be a good to post this as a follow-up to the off-piste video posted in Max_501's thread.

Note that these are not high speed turns, taken on an easy blue slope at A-Basin.



I should also mentioned that my main take-away after viewing this final video with CO_Steve is that I was not flexing to match in my releases. So I'm not maintaining the flex of my inside ski as I flex to release the old stance ski. There's a straightening of the old inside/new stance leg that is probably the primary cause of my heel pushes at the top of the turn. Since camp my two main objectives have been to flex to release/flex to engage (matching the flex between the legs through transition) and tipping more aggressively with my feet still under my upper body.
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby milesb » Sun Mar 24, 2013 11:18 am

.......Since camp my two main objectives have been to flex to release/flex to engage (matching the flex between the legs through transition)......

What particular things are you doing to achieve this objective?
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby HighAngles » Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:31 pm

I can't think of any drills for ensuring that you flex to match (maybe the double pole drag). There are tons of tipping drills, but the critical element is ensuring you're doing them correctly. Mostly I've been just slowing everything down and providing more focus on these 2 areas in my skiing.
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby MonsterMan » Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:55 pm

My amateur 2c worth for my own MA practice as much as anything. As always, expect my betters to correct if this is out.

You mention that you think the major issue was flexing to release and timing of this. Only you as the skier can know what you had in your head that run, but in my opinion, you would do well to show us observers that you own an "O shape". The amount of flexing you were doing would have been adequate for those turns if you found your uphill LTE and stayed there a while. The timing doesn't seem all that out to my eye either.

I know you mentioned somewhere that you've been working on your lower body recently and what I see may be already corrected, but on the evidence presented in the video:

I would council working on your inside foot pullback. When the inside foot is lightened, tipped AND pulled back aggressively, the new inside knee further up the kinetic chain will move away from the new stance leg knee and show a lovely O shape.

How do you enjoy pmts javelins? Just a thought.
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby MonsterMan » Sun Mar 24, 2013 6:02 pm

Freeze frames added to discuss.

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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby HighAngles » Mon Apr 01, 2013 6:33 pm

MonsterMan wrote:My amateur 2c worth for my own MA practice as much as anything. As always, expect my betters to correct if this is out.

You mention that you think the major issue was flexing to release and timing of this. Only you as the skier can know what you had in your head that run, but in my opinion, you would do well to show us observers that you own an "O shape". The amount of flexing you were doing would have been adequate for those turns if you found your uphill LTE and stayed there a while. The timing doesn't seem all that out to my eye either.

I know you mentioned somewhere that you've been working on your lower body recently and what I see may be already corrected, but on the evidence presented in the video:

I would council working on your inside foot pullback. When the inside foot is lightened, tipped AND pulled back aggressively, the new inside knee further up the kinetic chain will move away from the new stance leg knee and show a lovely O shape.

How do you enjoy pmts javelins? Just a thought.


After skiing with Max_501 and JBotti for a day (and receiving a lot of feedback) I believe I can answer some of the questions posed in this post.

When performing the O-frame drill in the flats I absolutely can perform the drill correctly. That doesn't necessarily mean that I always initiate my turns with LTE tipping of the new free foot though (as other video has shown). When moving at normal speeds and not drilling, it is rare to see an actual O-frame develop - the movements are occurring too fast. You do not see an O-frame in Max_501's free-skiing, nor does he spend more than a tiny fraction of a second ever traversing along balanced on the LTE.

You are quite correct that I need to manage my inside foot pullback much more consistently. However, once again I will disagree on whether you will see an obvious O-frame in normal free-skiing. The stance leg should "come along for the ride" and match the angle established by the free leg tipping. Yes, an O-frame is usually a clear indicator of tipping the new free foot first, but the lack of an obvious O-frame is NOT necessarily an indicator that free foot tipping is not leading the turn initiation.

After doing some PMTS javelin turn drills with Max_501 I now understand that I was missing some critical elements of that drill to ensure that it is performed correctly. The two critical elements I was missing was establishing balance on the uphill LTE BEFORE tipping the new free foot (this ensure that the uphill ski actually performs a complete edge change as it rolls from LTE to BTE through free foot tipping) and I was not pulling back the free foot far enough to match the position of the stance boot. With these two key focus points I was able to greatly improve my performance of the javelin drill.
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby MonsterMan » Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:18 pm

Thanks for explaining your thoughts high angles.

I guess we may disagree from a style viewpoint more than anything. Your skiing would look much 'prettier' for my eyes at least if you free skied using what you can do in 'drills'.

The stance leg 'coming along for the ride' is obviously a good thought for you as a BTE dominant skier, my question is, do you consciously think tip BTE more as the turn progresses? or does it really just follow without thought? I ask because I need to consciously add BTE so am interested how others think with different anatomy/setups.

In the off-piste thread, I made a comment about Max501's O Frame. I think it's great. Indeed, a further question is. Can you flex your legs to 90 degrees and tip to LTE and pullback without an O Frame?

I think my anatomy needs to lengthen the outside edge a little before I can tip to BTE after a deep flex. These are genuine questions to hopefully enhance MY knowledge and no offense is intended.

ps got recent video??

Thanks

Geoff
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby Max_501 » Mon Apr 01, 2013 8:43 pm

MonsterMan, I started PMTS as a BTE dominant tail pusher. Now I always think of tipping to the LTE and almost never think of tipping to the BTE. I worked hard this season on combining flex+pullback+tipping which I needed for the next level of off-piste skiing. In my case, if an O frame happens its so quick that its just luck when its caught on camera.
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