More MA for JohnMoore

More MA for JohnMoore

Postby JohnMoore » Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:44 am

At the risk of trying people's patience, I've put up some more video here which I'd forgotten we'd taken, and I'd be interested in any feedback.

Firstly, here's one done on a slightly gentler slope than the others I posted - still a red, but not a steep pitch, the only difficult being the wet, rucked up snow. This was one of the video session which made me rattled, because a small group of people stopped just above where my partner was waiting to film me and didn't move for ages (I thought they'd taken up residence there), then just as they moved away, a ski class came down the slope. I waited till they had disappeared over the horizon to the left and then set off, intending to ski past my camera-wielding partner, but had to hurriedly abort because the class had come back across the slope (I really thought they'd gone down).



Secondly, here's the top of a bump run under a lift. This shows the rather benign top section - further down, just beyond where I stop, the bumps get much higher and tougher.



Incidentally, I've been looking at all these videos, frame by frame, using the open source video editor Avidemux, and it's something I strongly recommend people do with their own video, as it's amazing what a frame by frame analysis reveals. It's really given me a lot more information about what I'm actually doing, which is often difficult to make out in normal video viewing. It has confirmed that at least some of the time I am actually releasing by flexing and tipping, albeit in a probably incorrect way. The section from 15.5 to 16.5 seconds in the first video shows a typical turn that I'm making in these conditions, where I am strongly pulling the stance leg out of the snow such that I actually take off momentarily, tipping to the little toe edge with the free foot. But the weird thing, which I can see on other turns as well, is that the tip of my free foot ski is actually further off the ground than the tail, something which Max_501 spotted in one of the other videos. Presumably this reveals something about my fore/aft balance, and I imagine the cure is to concentrate even more on pulling my feet back under my hips.
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Re: More MA for JohnMoore

Postby MonsterMan » Wed Mar 31, 2010 4:39 pm

based on this new video, fore aft stands out to me as the most important focus for a day or two. But try to do it without pole plants for many many runs as the hands were working against your obvious efforts to counter.

I suggest when Max501 asks you how you know if you are doing those extensive drills correctly he really is suggesting that you probably are not or at least not with enough magnitude. In my limited, but growing, experience with pmts, as the movements become more ingrained, when we re-visit our focus on each essential there is always another level of competence that can be achieved. I'm sure you would swear that your re centering moves were aggressive, but I suggest to you that you now need to use the same movements, but with double or even triple the magnitude that you are now comfortable with on the easier terrain. Do you do the flapper excercise? Practice pullback at all parts of the arc.

Learn what the front of the boot feels like on you shins. Often when I am stopped, I slide the uphill ski way forward, (review the for/aft dvd), and stand on the downhill ski to ingrain that feeling of having the foot behind the hips.

To really do a free foot pullback well enough to keep the ski tips level, (the external que; it's ok to look down when learning), you need to actually bend the front of the ski on hard snow to get this correct. I feel this in my knee when I do it enough and now that I associate this feeling with the correct movement, I no longer need to look down to confirm.
"Someone once said to me that for us to beat the Europeans at winter sports was like Austria tackling us at Test cricket. I reckon it's an accurate judgement." Malcolm Milne
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Re: More MA for JohnMoore

Postby JohnMoore » Thu Apr 01, 2010 2:25 am

MonsterMan wrote:based on this new video, fore aft stands out to me as the most important focus for a day or two. But try to do it without pole plants for many many runs as the hands were working against your obvious efforts to counter.

I suggest when Max501 asks you how you know if you are doing those extensive drills correctly he really is suggesting that you probably are not or at least not with enough magnitude. In my limited, but growing, experience with pmts, as the movements become more ingrained, when we re-visit our focus on each essential there is always another level of competence that can be achieved. I'm sure you would swear that your re centering moves were aggressive, but I suggest to you that you now need to use the same movements, but with double or even triple the magnitude that you are now comfortable with on the easier terrain. Do you do the flapper excercise? Practice pullback at all parts of the arc.

Learn what the front of the boot feels like on you shins. Often when I am stopped, I slide the uphill ski way forward, (review the for/aft dvd), and stand on the downhill ski to ingrain that feeling of having the foot behind the hips.

To really do a free foot pullback well enough to keep the ski tips level, (the external que; it's ok to look down when learning), you need to actually bend the front of the ski on hard snow to get this correct. I feel this in my knee when I do it enough and now that I associate this feeling with the correct movement, I no longer need to look down to confirm.


Thanks for this, great tips. Following a discussion on this forum after my last ski trip, I was really trying to feel my shins against the front of my boots this time, but definitely had a problem maintaining that - as I mentioned, I found it more difficult to remain centred over the skis I hired this time (Head Peak 76 in 163cm) than I did over the Rossignol CX80 in 170cm I hired last trip, which surprised me. I was finding myself slightly on the tails a lot more. This was not what I would have expected from an easier flexing, shorter ski and I really can't understand why this would be so, unless it's something to do with binding placement or delta angle or something like that.
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Re: More MA for JohnMoore

Postby h.harb » Thu Apr 01, 2010 6:49 am

Where are you skiing in the section under the lift?
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Re: More MA for JohnMoore

Postby JohnMoore » Thu Apr 01, 2010 6:54 am

h.harb wrote:Where are you skiing in the section under the lift?


Do you mean what line am I taking? In general I'm following the troughs, the 'easy' way through, although trying to keep enough flexibility so that I can absorb bumps. You can see at one point that I nearly lose it, where I go from bright sunlight into shade and can't see where I'm going! I really need to work on flexing and extending, I know that.
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Re: More MA for JohnMoore

Postby Max_501 » Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:06 am

John, what skis are you on in the lift run clip?
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Re: More MA for JohnMoore

Postby JohnMoore » Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:19 am

Max_501 wrote:John, what skis are you on in the lift run clip?


I'm on TT Icon 40.0, in 164cm length. Can't find out much about them, other than that they seem to be an intermediate level piste ski.
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