MA for JohnMoore

Re: MA for JohnMoore

Postby JohnMoore » Thu Apr 01, 2010 8:04 am

jbotti wrote:Notice the A frame that is occuring in almost every turn. This can also be caused by poor alignment when a skier is doing the movemenst correctlly, but your A frame is at least partially caused by the fact that you are not tipping to initiate the truns.


Could you explain the mechanism of this a little more, please? I've been looking at the videos frame by frame as I mentioned, and I haven't quite been able to work out why the A frame is occurring.
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Re: MA for JohnMoore

Postby milesb » Thu Apr 01, 2010 8:37 am

John Moore, I suggest you build a tipping board. There are many things you can practice on it-in front of a mirror is best:
1. leading the tipping with the new free foot to the little toe edge
2. the O frame mentioned above.
3. flexing to release.
4. tipping while flexed.
5. counterbalancing in the high C
6. counterbalancing in the lower C
7. raising/lowering the hip
8. weighted release*
9. super phantom*
10. counteracting
11. combining and coordinating these movements.
12. developing overall balance

Obviously you won't feel any of the forces or sensations that these movements provide while skiing. But there is a great benefit to being able to practice them over and over at various speeds and intensities, both isolated and combined. Plus no distractions by any forces and sensations (like slipping on ice, chunky snow, need for speed control,other skiers) And you can actually see what you are doing!

* anyone trying this, please be very careful with these, as it can put alot of stress on the lower leg and knee joint if you aren't deeply flexed and counterbalanced. Or if your tipping board is steep- make it very gentle at first.
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Re: MA for JohnMoore

Postby Max_501 » Thu Apr 01, 2010 9:24 am

JohnMoore wrote:
jbotti wrote:Notice the A frame that is occuring in almost every turn. This can also be caused by poor alignment when a skier is doing the movemenst correctlly, but your A frame is at least partially caused by the fact that you are not tipping to initiate the truns.


Could you explain the mechanism of this a little more, please? I've been looking at the videos frame by frame as I mentioned, and I haven't quite been able to work out why the A frame is occurring.


It all comes back to the RTE. Release, Transfer, Engage. In this case we are talking about engage (or initiating) the new turn. Start the initiation/engagment by tipping the new inside ski to the little toe edge (LTE). Make sure you keep tipping to the LTE throughout the turn. As the turn progresses try to increase the LTE tipping. When LTE tipping is missing or lacking an A-frame will be the result.

The other reason we can see an A-Frame is because of alignment.
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Re: MA for JohnMoore

Postby JohnMoore » Thu Apr 01, 2010 9:33 am

Max_501 wrote:It all comes back to the RTE. Release, Transfer, Engage. In this case we are talking about engage (or initiating) the new turn. Start the initiation/engagment by tipping the new inside ski to the little toe edge (LTE). Make sure you keep tipping to the LTE throughout the turn. As the turn progresses try to increase the LTE tipping. When LTE tipping is missing or lacking an A-frame will be the result.

The other reason we can see an A-Frame is because of alignment.


Thanks for the explanation - it's becoming a lot clearer to me now. I suspect in my case it is largely technique that is to blame, rather than alignment, because I kludged a solution with strips of credit card under the inside edge of my boot soles, following Harald's suggestion that I had a slightly knock-kneed stance. I'll need to get it checked professionally but this is one area where I don't think I can blame my equipment...
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Re: MA for JohnMoore

Postby Max_501 » Thu Apr 01, 2010 9:44 am

JohnMoore wrote:Thanks for the explanation - it's becoming a lot clearer to me now. I suspect in my case it is largely technique that is to blame, rather than alignment, because I kludged a solution with strips of credit card under the inside edge of my boot soles, following Harald's suggestion that I had a slightly knock-kneed stance. I'll need to get it checked professionally but this is one area where I don't think I can blame my equipment...


John, you could be absolutely right here. Just wanted to point out that the footbed also plays a role. If you don't have a well designed footbed you can still drop to the inside regards of shims you place under the boots.
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Re: MA for JohnMoore

Postby jbotti » Thu Apr 01, 2010 9:55 am

JohnMoore wrote:
jbotti wrote:Notice the A frame that is occuring in almost every turn. This can also be caused by poor alignment when a skier is doing the movemenst correctlly, but your A frame is at least partially caused by the fact that you are not tipping to initiate the truns.


Could you explain the mechanism of this a little more, please? I've been looking at the videos frame by frame as I mentioned, and I haven't quite been able to work out why the A frame is occurring.


John, Max did a fine job with explaining this, but the most simple way to expalin an A frame and why it occurs is simply that both BTE's are engaged at the same time. There really is no way to do this without forming an A frame and the dreaded stem. The key to stop it is LTE tipping before the new BTE is engaged.
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Re: MA for JohnMoore

Postby milesb » Thu Apr 01, 2010 11:15 am

It can also (as in a few of his turns) happen as a result of not tipping the free foot at the end of the turn. This often causes the stance foot to break loose down the hill, and that makes it very difficult to tip it to it's LTE before the uphill ski gets on it's BTE. As mentioned, alignment and footbeds can be a big factor with this, but it still needs to be practiced.
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