MA for HighAngles

Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby HighAngles » Mon Dec 02, 2013 2:27 pm

Ken wrote:HA, here's my own test for my counterbalance...In a turn I should be able to momentarily lift my free foot (inside foot) off the snow. Just an instantaneous tap, but if I can do that, I know that I'm getting things together. If I can tap the free foot off the snow in my drill, then I'm not stuck on it and can put as much or as little weight on it as I choose. If I can't tap that foot, then I know that I need to dial up my CA and CB. More counteracting enables more counterbalancing, as does a person's individual flexibility.

Yep, this was one of the most critical lacking fundamentals in my skiing, but I have a handle on it now... :D
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby HighAngles » Sun Jan 20, 2019 5:18 pm

Hi,

I'm reviving my MA thread after many years away from the snow. Health problems took me away from skiing for 4 seasons. What happened in that absence is I lost much of what I had gained in the few seasons of PMTS work I had put in. It sucks, but life sometimes can deal you a tough hand. I'm still dealing with leg/ankle pain and I'm way over my normal "fighting" weight, but I'm trying to come back to where I was previously and take it from there. I don't have huge goals for this season other than just trying to stay healthy and restart my PMTS journey.

I had the opportunity to ski with Heluva for 5 days back in December. Geoffda was also there with Heluva for a couple days. One of the best things coming out of this time skiing together and reviewing video is that my stance alignment is finally getting closer to being dialed in. There's still more work to do, but I'm now 1* in on the left and 1* out on the right. I also experimented with a toe lift (gas pedal). I just re-read this thread and noticed that Harald had suggested long ago that I test this, but I finally got around to it. Raising my toes has been almost "life changing" on the slopes. For the first time I feel like I can actually get forward and want to stay there. I have had my B3 RD shells permanently plated and I have a new pair of B2 RD shells that I'm working on getting into.

I have a new video to post, but it's almost embarrassing to see just how much my skiing has regressed. Nonetheless, I understand the value of this forum and the feedback it provides. My takeaway after seeing my videos is that my SMIM is still CA, but honestly, I need to go back to Book 1 Exercise 1 and completely start over and validate that I can do all the drills correctly.

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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby Max_501 » Sun Jan 20, 2019 7:37 pm

I think you're being overly hard on yourself, coming back from an injury isn't easy! CA/CB (from the pelvis up) are places to work. You also have an early extension that pops up (pun intended) once in a while so it wouldn't hurt to do some exercises where you flex and exaggerate holding the flex into the turn. This is nit picking but I'd like to see stronger tipping to the LTE at the top of the turn.
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby geezer skier » Mon Jan 21, 2019 2:05 pm

I agree with Max. I would love to be embarrassed skiing like you do. :D :D :D
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Re: MA for HighAngles

Postby HighAngles » Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:25 pm

New videos available (courtesy of Heluva). Great snow, minimal pitch. My focus for these runs was on exhausting my tipping range before the hip moves inside the turn. I also have much shorter poles now (almost 4" shorter than what I was using previously).





Besides still needing MORE of everything...

After reviewing these videos in slow motion multiple times, I realized that I still have a form of extension in my turns (6 forms of extension was recently quoted/provided by HH in one of the recent threads). I am extending the old inside leg coming into transition. I should only be flexing the old stance leg to match the flex of the inside leg and then tipping for the new turn. I think this has been referred to as "flex-to-match" (in between flex-to-release and flex-to-engage?).

So the last time I was out skiing I really focused on only flexing the old stance leg and leaving the inside leg at the maximum flexion attained at the turn apex. It made a major difference in the feel of my turns. Probably the biggest thing I noticed was that my upper body stayed at a more consistent distance away from the snow surface. There wasn't as much "up and down" motion because the focus on the flexion of the stance leg was resulting in more flexing than I usually have in my turn transitions. I also worked on flexing the stance leg earlier in the turn (just after the apex) and trying to be "softer" into the transition instead of the edges digging in hard at the end/bottom of the turn. This focus allowed me to get more tipping and edge engagement in the High-C portion of the turn, resulting in tighter turns with less chatter.
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