l2ski motion analysis

Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby l2ski » Tue Feb 07, 2017 11:58 am

I have been to the mountain about 4 times since the last video, working on the release and the phantom move.
I have again studied chapters 4,5,6 in Book 1 and have been using the brushed carve e-video for demonstration
of the release. I know I still have work to do but I believe I have made some progress.

Here is an attempt at some slow turns with emphasis on release and balance transfer.



Here is an attempt to ski a little faster (but slowly) on an easy green run.



In the first video, I was trying very hard to get the o-frame but could not.
I believe I need to be more passive with the stance ski and hold back the tipping some more.

Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.
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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby l2ski » Tue Feb 07, 2017 2:23 pm

Here is one more video skiing an easy green.
I lost concentration in the end with those people around me.

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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby Max_501 » Wed Feb 08, 2017 7:21 am

Compare the amount of tipping in your o-frame attempt to the tipping Diana demonstrates:

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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby l2ski » Wed Feb 08, 2017 8:05 am

Max_501 wrote:Compare the amount of tipping in your o-frame attempt to the tipping Diana demonstrates:


I know, I have almost none compared to her, yet I'm trying to tip and transfer balance smoothly.
I'll work exclusively on the slow releases the next time out with focus on maxing out on tipping.

Should I have been flexed more in the slow release turns in order to gain more tipping range?

It's been warm here and the snow is very sticky. If I try doing the slow release to one full turn
from a static start, then I have a really hard time getting the skis to release and slide.

Thanks again; I'll report back in a few days.
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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby Max_501 » Wed Feb 08, 2017 8:10 am

l2ski wrote:Should I have been flexed more in the slow release turns in order to gain more tipping range?


Look at Diana's flexion and compare to yours.

If possible have a skiing buddy watch the clip with Diana so they have a reference point of what you are trying to match. Then have them watch you on the hill so they can provide instant feedback. When I'm coaching you'll often hear me saying "more, More, MORE!"
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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby l2ski » Wed Feb 08, 2017 8:15 am

l2ski wrote:In the first video, I was trying very hard to get the o-frame but could not.
I believe I need to be more passive with the stance ski and hold back the tipping some more.


I really didn't mean hold back tipping in general. I meant to say that I think I should
delay the tipping of the new stance ski to BTE some more while increasing the tipping of the
new free ski to LTE.
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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby l2ski » Wed Feb 08, 2017 11:17 am

Max_501 wrote:
l2ski wrote:Should I have been flexed more in the slow release turns in order to gain more tipping range?


Look at Diana's flexion and compare to yours.

If possible have a skiing buddy watch the clip with Diana so they have a reference point of what you are trying to match. Then have them watch you on the hill so they can provide instant feedback. When I'm coaching you'll often hear me saying "more, More, MORE!"


Yes, I went to look at this frame of Diana after I asked the question.

Image
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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby l2ski » Sun Feb 19, 2017 6:08 am

I managed to get four mornings of skiing this week, with three consecutive ones,
and the previous week I had two or three, but there is no camera man so I don't have any video.
I'll get some video either this week or next.

I figured out this week that, yet again, I have been back on my heels for most of the season, and I believe
this is the other limiting factor in my tipping range.

The last couple of days I was focusing on raising the tail and leaving the tip on the snow
as I'm transferring balance. Is this accomplished with dorsiflexing, lift and pullback
to have the tail lifted?

I would try to continue holding the free boot back and close to the stance boot.
When I got it right, I felt like I was towering over my tips and
my arcs become much tighter with control at the end of the turn; it was a great
feeling, but I haven't been able to consistently reproduce this. I was working
on a not so steep blue run.

More video will be coming soon.
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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby Ken » Wed Mar 01, 2017 3:48 pm

I have been back on my heels

That was evident in your first video. Your toes should not be the first body part down the hill. On a very easy slope, practice your movements while being on the balls of your feet all the time. Learn to hold the free foot (inside foot) alongside the stance foot (outside foot) by using a strong pull back of the free foot all the time in every turn forever. On that easy slope practice sliding along and pulling both feet strongly back...not up...multiple times during a straight run and in large curves. Pull back strong & quick. Get to the point where the straight back pull results in the tails of the skis flapping up a bit on the snow. Still not an up-pull, make it a straight back pull. When you get the tail flappers working for you, now pull strongly back with both feet and immediately tip-to-turn. You will feel that you're hanging on the tongues of your boots. Good. This will be your indicator of how far you've pulled your feet back to begin the turn. The tighter the turn and the steeper the pitch, the more you need to pull back. After you pull both feet way back, and lighten and tip the free foot to start your turn, strongly pull the free (inside) foot back all the time, tip more and lighten more. Every turn. Forever. Exaggerate the movements on the easy slope, then gradually work your way up the mountain to steeper slopes using a stronger pull back for the steeper pitches. With enough repetitions these pull back movements will be automatic and you will never sit back on your skis again.

As always, do one thing at a time. Develop the sequence of what movement follows the previous movement. There are sequential movements and simultaneous movements, but practice one at a time, then add the next in the sequence to that.

I meant to say that I think I should delay the tipping of the new stance ski to BTE

You do not tip the stance ski to its big toe edge. You keep that leg aligned straight (bit of knee flex for shock absorption). Your body movement across the skis tips that ski. There are intentional movements (tipping the free ski to its little toe edge) and incidental movements (the stance ski coming on edge due to the body moving across the ski...or the ski skiing out away from the body). Just lighten and tip the free foot.

There are drills you can do to build the flex-to-release movement into your repertoire. One is to reach down and touch both boots with your hands for the moment both skis are flat on the snow in the release, then stand and tip-to-turn. Or skiing along at a pretty good pace, exaggerate the flex by pulling your knees up to your chest at each release. I think of pulling my knees up. Others think of pulling their feet up. Whatever works for you. This puts one into the back seat momentarily due to stiff boots, then you pull the feet back as you've been practicing and get re-centered and in balance for your next turn. Ski straight across some small moguls making an exaggerated absorption movement--knees pulled way up--the legs straightened down into the trough, repeat, repeat. Do several, then add tip-to-turn just after your toes cross the crest of the bump. Just as your toes cross the crest, pull your feet back (as you already know how to do) to get your tips down to the snow. Hey...you learned mogul skiing!
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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby l2ski » Thu Mar 02, 2017 7:20 am

Ken,

I greatly appreciate your time and detailed analysis.

Ken wrote:
I have been back on my heels

Learn to hold the free foot (inside foot) alongside the stance foot (outside foot) by using a strong pull back of the free foot all the time in every turn forever. On that easy slope practice sliding along and pulling both feet strongly back...not up...multiple times during a straight run and in large curves. Pull back strong & quick. Get to the point where the straight back pull results in the tails of the skis flapping up a bit on the snow. Still not an up-pull, make it a straight back pull.


I have been doing exactly this since I wrote my last comment. The last time
I skied I believe I that I made some good progress in this area. I was able to link a good number of short tight
turns on a blue run. Being centered and in control throughout the arc makes everything easier because I'm in balance.


Ken wrote:
You do not tip the stance ski to its big toe edge. You keep that leg aligned straight (bit of knee flex for shock absorption). Your body movement across the skis tips that ski. There are intentional movements (tipping the free ski to its little toe edge) and incidental movements (the stance ski coming on edge due to the body moving across the ski...or the ski skiing out away from the body). Just lighten and tip the free foot.


I'm aware of this. I'm not actively trying to tip the new stance foot to BTE. However, I have observed
that, as my legs and body move across the skis
in transition, my new stance foot seems to be going faster to the BTE than the new free foot is toward LTE
before I begin any tipping with the free foot.
In slower turns I sometimes take a quick peek at my feet during transition. It seems that I simply need
to begin tipping the new free foot earlier to LTE and begin counterbalancing, and maybe holding back
the stance foot from tipping to BTE? I've been working on this since I've posted video.

I'll have to confirm everything with video in the upcoming weeks. This Sunday / Monday may be my
first opportunity to do that.
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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby Max_501 » Thu Mar 02, 2017 8:10 am

I'm guessing these two comments are meant to apply to drills only. Ken, can you clarify?

Ken wrote:On a very easy slope, practice your movements while being on the balls of your feet all the time.


Ken wrote:You will feel that you're hanging on the tongues of your boots.


----------------------------------

Ken wrote:On that easy slope practice sliding along and pulling both feet strongly back...not up...multiple times during a straight run and in large curves.


I pull my heels back and up.
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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby l2ski » Thu Mar 02, 2017 8:33 am

Max_501 wrote:I pull my heels back and up.


For the drill where I pull back both feet on flat terrain as much as possible,
my legs and body extend as in the Essentials book pictures of HH,
and my tails lift up momentarily as I balance on the tips.

I also feel the heel of my foot lifting inside the boot.
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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby l2ski » Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:22 am

Hello everybody, I'm back.

I took video for the first time this season and it doesn't look good.
I will not post the video, but I found enough courage to post
40 consecutive video frames for 1 transition.
I am struggling with the the transition.

The frames can be found here:
http://telluron.com/~lazanja/Skiing-2018/2018.02.10/video-frames/

I recommend downloading the zip file, which contains the entire folder of frames,
and viewing the entire folder with an image viewer to traverse between images.

My question is, what is causing the stem or A-Frame. Is it due to placing the LTE of the
old inside ski too far from the old stance ski; Inside foot management seems to break down
during the release. If I work on inside foot management should that fix this?

Thanks for looking.

Update:

I combined the frames into a slow motion video:

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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby RRT » Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:59 pm

There is a wedge showing up in the turns and thus an A-frame. Being able to stand on the uphill little toe edge while lifting, tipping and holding the old stance (downhill) ski off the ground is basic to turn progression and, in my very humble opinion, a SMIM at this point. In the eVideo on Eliminate the Wedge, 3, Diana meticulously demonstrates the skill including how to maintain balance over the skis. If you don't have them, it may be worthwhile purchasing all 3 eVideos on the topic.

https://harbskisystems.com/collections/evideos
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Re: l2ski motion analysis

Postby Max_501 » Tue Feb 13, 2018 6:40 pm

l2ski wrote:If I work on inside foot management should that fix this?


That's the right idea but start at the beginning to build a solid release. This still applies:

Max_501 wrote:The main issue is that you don't have a release. For drills to build a release I'd start with the Releasing chapter of Expert Skier Book 1 and the Eliminate the Wedge 3 Super Phantom eVideo.

The free PMTS Online Ski Lesson provides a good introduction on what it takes to build a functional release.
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