Right boot tail lift

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Right boot tail lift

Postby skijim13 » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:55 am

Does anyone have suggestions on how to reduce my right foot tail lift which is higher than my left tail? During my last camp it was pointed out that my right tail lifts too high for highly effective turns. I have been trying to fix this but due to my left leg being weaker than my right due to a hamstring injury I find it very hard to know I am during it until I see my video. I need a good external cue to fix this. I have been using a tip lift first to try to fix this but still have an difference between my right and left tipping due to the time lost with the higher right foot tail lift.
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Re: Right boot tail lift

Postby jbotti » Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:04 am

I would work on two footed weighted releases and get comfortable and good at tipping with the ski on the snow. Generally when people lift too high its because they want the ski out of of the way and off the snow (and somewhat out of fear of digging the inside ski). Getting comfortable with high quality releases with both skis on the ground/snow is an important part of the PMTS progression. This will require much more CB than you might have in your skiing currently (otherwise you will dig the inside ski). I think it will help you lift less high once this is dialed into your skiing.

It may be somewhat out of progression from what you've been told to work on in camps but at some point you will need to dial in these releases.

Working on lifting the ski while adding a lot more CB may also get you the result as you will be able to keep the ski lower to the ground without fear of digging with the added CB.
Balance: Essential in skiing and in life!
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Re: Right boot tail lift

Postby Max_501 » Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:44 am

Unfortunately I don't know of a good external cue for lifting too high but you can try to break the habit by working the opposite end of the spectrum. In addition to the excellent suggestion from jbotti I'd try working on any drills that keep both skis on the snow. Phantom drag, shuffling, hinging exercises, etc.
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Re: Right boot tail lift

Postby ToddW » Wed Feb 14, 2018 3:54 pm

Jim,

Here's a thought if you do go the 2-footed route: slow garlands. (It's been a year since I've skied with you, so this may be all out of date.)

Recall last year the dramatic improvement in your turns after you did set-scrape-tilt for a couple of runs? You were a different skier. A big part of that was entering into your new turns balanced over the new stance ski rather than trying to "juice" the turn with old habits (or letting the skis flop down).

To find this same balance on two feet, start skiing across the hill in a traverse as if entering a drawn-out transition. This means that you'll be tipping to your uphill edges, counteracted facing down the slope, and counterbalanced out over the downhill ski. Now do a slow garland -- half turn down the hill and no farther turning slowly to test your balance. Keep skiing straight downhill a couple of ski lengths much like follow through in racket sports to avoid mixing in thoughts of stopping or the next iteration of the garland. Rinse wash and repeat. Slow means slow, not sorta kinda slow. If your skis turn other than slowly despite aiming for slow, you're using something other than balance to stay up and your skis are getting "illicit" input to turn. You should be able to drag it out at will. Even linger at the moment of flat skis and see that they don't twist, that you don't feel rushed, and that your boots are close together side to side and fore-aft, and afterwards confirm that your tracks were brushed not moonshaped ... because then you are in good balance.

Trying to turn further than simply into the fall line will encourage you to do "things" to make your skis turn. Not good at first. Once you get this down, alternate drawn out with 1) closer to normal turn timing or 2) drawn out but progressively more turn than just into the fall line.

My guess is that you'll learn something about your flexing or upper body movements doing this.

Back to your 1-footed issue. Since the high lift occurs when your weak leg becomes the stance leg, is there any chance that you're doing a bit of a disguised up movement after the weight shifts to that leg to reduce the muscular load? That would have some visual similarity to a big inside foot lift.
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Re: Right boot tail lift

Postby skijim13 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 4:43 am

Thanks everyone for the great suggestions, I have printed them out and will work on them this weekend. I am heading out for another camp (bump camp) next week and hope to fix this.
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Re: Right boot tail lift

Postby h.harb » Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:40 am

Make sure you are using dorsiflexion with your foot and ankle in your boot. Even if there is little movement available, just the tension alone will help the hamstring perform better. Also bring your hips down, knees up and chest more toward the knees "forward" during releasing.
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Re: Right boot tail lift

Postby skijim13 » Fri Feb 16, 2018 4:35 am

Harald,
Thanks for the advise, look forward to Bump camp. I will work on this at the mountain this weekend.
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