Tipping board exercises

PMTS Forum

Postby -- SCSA » Sat Feb 28, 2004 8:53 am

LM,

The dyna disc kicks arse! I got the idea from some hot chick I met. Get this? The chick had even met Fred Lebow!

Now that's, a chick I'd like to hang with!
:D :)
-- SCSA
 

AW Shucks!

Postby LM » Sat Feb 28, 2004 12:44 pm

:oops: Yo SCSA! Something may be up for me in Co. But I need objective advice. Will drop you an email. Sorry I missed you at Jackson!
LM
 

balance board with ski boots....

Postby tommy » Fri Apr 16, 2004 9:13 am

I just purchased new boots (on Harald's recommendation). I've spent a few hours today at home with my boots on, to see if my feet will "accept" them.

Since I use my balance board quite often, but normally bare footed, I wanted to try what it would be like to stand on the boards with boots on.

It was quite interesting to see how much more difficult it turned out to be to maintain balance in ski boots: lateral balance wasn't much of a problem, but as soon as the board started tipping backwards, it was almost impossible to recover, the stiffness of boots doesn't seem to allow for whatever recovering move that would be needed.

--Tommy
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Balance with boots

Postby Lisa » Mon Apr 19, 2004 9:46 am

Hi Tommy,

There is a sports conditioning organization in Vancouver Ca. called Twist Conditioning. After an athlete has mastered a skill on a balance device, they have them try it with the footwear they will be using for their specfic sport. This is a great idea! My frustration with teaching sport conditioning in a health club setting, is that this will never be allowed. When I get my own place, I would think about putting this in a program.
Lisa
 

Postby Harald » Tue Apr 20, 2004 8:31 am

There are some situations where training using skiing equipment, boots etc is preferential, such as with ski simulators, examples are rolling devices such as the ?Carvers? and inlines. But to enhance balance and strength and specific movements of the ankle and foot, you may want to be out of the ski boot.

When you are in a ski boot on snow, you have little range of motion of the ankle. After the ankle has moved to the end of its range, the muscles are used in an isometric contraction against resistance from the ground, (plantar flexion) or boot and tipping resistance (in eversion and inversion). When you are on a titter or tipping board, especially with one foot balance exercises, the board changes the environment, as ground reaction is almost eliminated due to the range of motion of the board. The board offers range of motion that far exceeds the range of motion you can achieve on snow. The slightest movement when in a ski boot on a tipping board can put you off. But this is not the case on snow or the ground. The boots on snow allow one to push against the surface to rebalance. The balance board doesn?t allow this reaction; therefore the way you balance in a boot, on a tipping board is totally different and not applicable to skiing. In fact, balancing on a tipping board with ski boots is more like inline skating, than skiing. The inline offers no resistance to tipping. Skis and Carvers do.
Harald
 

Postby tommy » Wed Apr 21, 2004 5:26 am

Hi Lisa,

like Harald says in his reply, I've found that for working out purposes, to exercise the muscles in the foot and lower leg, it's better to be bare footed. That allows much more movement of the foot, for instance you can "roll" the wobble board around, which I've found to be a very good exercise.

Standing on the board with boots on is much more demanding on your balancing ability, for the reasons Harald states in his post.

So, my understanding so far is that for a workout, no shoes, but for balance, use boots.

Cheers,
Tommy
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Postby Lisa » Wed Apr 21, 2004 8:54 am

Just to clarify, because I think we are all more or less on the same page, with perhaps a feww isuues of semantics. Most sport medicine professionals will teach the moves in bare feet first. As a matter of fact, there are very specific progressions: from two footed balances, to one foot, to eyes closed, then to doing the same exercises on different types of balance devices. The progtressions would be different for each individual. It depends on the sport they play, as well as the imbalances in the feet that are unique to that individual.

Doing the exercise in the footwear unique to the sport is only the end product, and will only be done when the athlete has mastered the other progressions.
Lisa
 

Re: Tipping board exercises

Postby tigernbr » Sun Jun 04, 2017 9:07 am

I know this thread is old but does anyone have the plans on how to make a tipping board like the one Harald uses?
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Re: Tipping board exercises

Postby skijim13 » Mon Jun 05, 2017 3:54 am

Go to Harb systems.com website and look up slant board training the plans are there.
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Re: Tipping board exercises

Postby tigernbr » Mon Jun 05, 2017 6:34 am

Those are the plans for the slant board. I'm looking for the plans to make a tipping board for balance practice. There are pictures of it in ACBAES2 and the Instructor Manual but I'd like to see the dimensions of the board and the dowel/pipe underneath it so I can make one of my own. It looks fairly simple. The dimensions of the board are probably around 4"x12". It's the diameter of the dowel I am unsure of. I would imagine that diameter greatly affects your ability to balance on one foot on the board.
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Re: Tipping board exercises

Postby Robert0325 » Mon Jun 05, 2017 9:24 am

I approximated from the picture in the book or somewhere on line. I think I used a piece of 1" steel pipe when I made mine a few years ago and I remember thinking the same as you that diameter will affect balance. I'll double check overall sizes when I get home and let you know.

Other thing that affects how easy it is to use is the surface of the actual floor. i.e. on a carpet, dead easy to balance. On smooth concrete, quite difficult!

Other method which doesn't involve making anything, as explained in the essentials book, is to put your ski boots on and then lay a ski pole on the floor and try to balance on that. Very difficult!
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Re: Tipping board exercises

Postby tigernbr » Mon Jun 05, 2017 9:59 am

Thanks Robert! If you can measure the board itself too, I would appreciate it. Also, how did you attach the pipe to the board?
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Re: Tipping board exercises

Postby tigernbr » Mon Jun 12, 2017 7:14 am

I was able to make one over the weekend. The longest I can stand on it is about 5 seconds on each foot. It is tough!
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Re: Tipping board exercises

Postby Robert0325 » Wed Jun 14, 2017 8:59 am

Sorry tigernbr, meant to take a picture of mine showing how I constructed it but never got round to it. Presumably you've come up with your own solution?
I would recommend using on a carpet first, then when you find that easy move to a hard surface.
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